Home
To Non-Academic Interests

Der Ring des Nibelungen

Richard Wagner

A new performance translation of Wagner's The Ring of the Nibelung into modern English by John W. Merck, Jr.

To Preface.
About Translations.
To Das Rheingold.
To Die Walküre.
To Die Götterdämmerung.

Preface


Richard Wagner was not a lovable person. My brief study of his life suggests someone who combined intense bigotry with overbearing arrogance. Wagner demanded favors from anyone who might possibly give them, stridently denounced anyone who was not his ally, and even betrayed his allies when it suited him. As if this weren't bad enough, his name was posthumously linked with the Third Reich. This being so, I feel that anyone who wishes to extol anything Wagnerian is obliged to make a clean breast of their motivations. I will dwell, for a few paragraphs, on Wagner's anitsemitism because I am especially concerned that my motives be clear to my Jewish friends and famsily. Here's my confession:

Understand, I have no special academic or musical knowledge of opera and my study of Wagner's life is VERY limited. I simply know what I like, and feel that I have thought enough on the subject for my thoughts to mean something.

For as long as I can remember, I've been exposed to Wagner. As a child, I listened to my father's LPs of his orchestral music. I've loved the Ring cycle since I first became familiar with it as an older child. By the time I entered college, I had spent over a decade enjoying the music of the Ring in one form or another. In all of this time, I knew little of Wagner's association with the Third Reich, and had no idea of the strong emotions his name could provoke.

I lost this innocence in college, where I learned about Wagner's personal antisemitism and was assured that Wagnerian characters such as Alberich, Mime, Sixtus Beckmesser, Klingsor, and other bad-guys were simply Jewish parodies. Informed that these operas were just huge vehicles for crude antisemitism, I was no longer comfortable listening to them. And yet, when I DID chance to hear part of one, I couldn't help experiencing a guilty pleasure. They still struck me as musically beautiful and dramatically compelling, and whatever the accepted dogma, I could listen to them at length without the whisper of anti-semitic thoughts creeping into mind. How could something so beautiful and moving be evil? I intuitively felt it was not. Could the blanket equation of Wagner's works with antisemitism be wrong, at least an oversimplification? Having spent much of the last ten years grappling with this question, I have concluded that however morally deficient Wagner may have been as a person, his operas are not, and that the specific accusation of antisemitism IN THE OPERAS weakens under close scrutiny.

Wagner's antisemitism: First of all, get this straight: I am neither an antisemite nor a germanophile. Wagner, by his own admission, was both. How all-consuming were these sentiments in his mind? Germanophilia is evident from his settings and subject matter: Of thirteen operas, seven, a simple majority, are set in Germany or deal with German issues. (Nine if we count the Netherlands as part of "Greater Germany.") This is much more than are set in any other country, yet nearly half of his works are based on such non-Germanic sources as Arthurian mythology, Shakespeare, and Italian history. Clearly Wagner's interests were not single-mindedly Germanic. Was his antisemitism all consuming? At least one of his characters is definitely meant to represent a Jew. Does this mean that ALL of his negative characters were meant to represent Jews? There are at least four reasons for doubt:

I can't claim that Alberich and his crew definitely aren't Jews in disguise, but these issues provide reasons for doubt. And yet, in popular culture, the thorough antisemitism of Wagner's bad guys is accepted without reservation. Where does this certainty come from?

Wagner and the Third Reich: In a nutshell, I suspect the guys in Nazi Propaganda Ministry earned their paychecks when they went to work on Wagner. They had every reason to want to co-opt the great figures of German cultural history, especially those who could be represented as their ideological precursors. Wagner must have been irresistible - a nationalistic composer on a grandiose scale with voluminous antisemitic writings to his credit. That Wagner's descendants who ran the Bayreuth Festspiel were enthusiastic Nazis amplified the opportunity. Still, in simple fairness, we have to resist equating Wagner with a Third Reich over which he had no control, no matter how effectively the Nazis transmitted Wagner's legacy through their own dark glass:

We can never know what Wagner would have thought of the Third Reich, but as before, there is at least room to view him as a proponent of old-fashioned religious antisemitism, rather than as a precursor to Hitler's "scientific racism." Obviously, anyone is free to dislike Wagner and his music and people who personally endured the Third Reich, might understandably associate this music with personal trauma. It would be sad, however, for an aversions born of personal traumas to be transmitted to others who might just as easily derive pleasure from it. By accident I managed to grow up without drawing traumatic associations between Wagner's music and the culture and politics of antisemitism. My personal vision of his world is a blessed release from the conflicts of ambiguous morals and ephemeral transience of personal relationships. In it, absolute true love and selfless personal goodness, however cruelly rewarded, are palpable real. I have tried to imbue these translations with my personal vision of the Ring. I hope they may be of service to people who want to judge Wagner's works on their intrinsic merits.

Return to top.

About the Translations

My interest in the Ring has always been strictly that of an amateur. In fact, I was brought to the point of creating these translations more by a peculiar set of coincidences that by any burning avocation. As a teenager and undergraduate, I listened to recordings of the Ring frequently enough that I could "play" large parts of it in my head. This ability stood me in good stead years later when, as a graduate student, I had to make several long research trips. These called for me to spend hours at a time confined to a car or train, during which I first amused myself by attempting to put compose singable English translations of passages that I remembered particularly well.

As chunks of English libretto text accumulated in my head over time, I began to reflect on the actual desirability of a new English translation. Unlike other operas, the Ring really requires its audience to get all of the verbal message and to get it at precisely the right musical moment. Moreover, the Ring is suffused with a raw emotional tone that amplifies its impact. Surtitles are plainly inadequate to the task of conveying this text fully and precisely. I believe that, whatever the shortcomings of performing an opera in translation, they are overwhelmed by advantages where the Ring is concerned. The performable translations I had encountered, however, did not seem to offer the full range of these advantages. Indeed, they seemed to fall into two groups:

What was necessary was a third category of translation, one in transparent, unaffected English that placed greatest emphasis on conveying correct meaning and dramatic tone. By the time I completed my Ph.D. the better part of Walküre and Götterdämmerung were kicking around in my head. At this time, I was feeling a great need to do something creative that wasn't related to my Ph.D. research, so I started actually writing them down. Ultimately completing the translations became, in effect, my "hobby."

Priorities: At this time, I have written complete drafts of translations for all the Ring operas except Siegfried. When I compare them to other English translations, I feel I have accomplished my goal of placing the dramatic clarity of the works before other considerations. Frankly, I have not made a comprehensive study of other translations because I don't wish to be influenced by them. What I have written attempts to capture the Ring as I personally experience and feel it and convey it as I would to an adult who was unfamiliar with the story. I present exerpts here in hopes that others might also appreciate my perspective on this unique work.

In preparing these translations, I have tried to observe the following priorities:

If you want to see more, or have suggestions for improvements, please drop me a line.

John Merck

To Non-Academic Interests
Return to top.

An Exerpt from
Das Rheingold

by
Richard Wagner

Translation by

John W. Merck, Jr.*

*This English translation may not be reproduced or performed without my written consent.
German text from Dirk Meyer's Der Ring des Nibelungen web site.


(Wotan und Loge, den gebundenen Alberich mit sich führend, steigen aus der Kluft herauf.)

LOGE

Da, Vetter, sitze du fest! Luge Liebster, dort liegt die Welt, die du Lungrer gewinnen dir willst: welch Stellchen, sag', bestimmst du drin mir zu Stall?

(er schlägt ihm tanzend Schnippchen)

ALBERICH

Schändlicher Schächer! Du Schalk! Du Schelm! Löse den Bast, binde mich los, den Frevel sonst büßest du Frecher!

WOTAN

Gefangen bist du, fest mir gefesselt, wie du die Welt, was lebt und webt, in deiner Gewalt schon wähntest, in Banden liegst du vor mir, du Banger kannst es nicht leugnen! Zu ledigen dich, bedarf 's nun der Lösung.

ALBERICH

O ich Tropf, ich träumender Tor! Wie dumm traut' ich dem diebischen Trug! Furchtbare Rache räche den Fehl!

LOGE

Soll Rache dir frommen, vor allem rate dich frei: dem gebundnen Manne büßt kein Freier den Frevel. Drum, sinnst du auf Rache, rasch ohne Säumen sorg' um die Lösung zunächst!

(er zeigt ihm, mit den Fingern schnalzend, die Art der Lösung an)

ALBERICH

(barsch)

So heischt, was ihr begehrt!

WOTAN

Den Hort und dein helles Gold.

ALBERICH

Gieriges Gaunergezücht!

(für sich)


Doch behalt' ich mir nur den Ring, des Hortes entrat' ich dann leicht; denn von neuem gewonnen und wonnig genährt ist er bald durch des Ringes Gebot: eine Witzigung wär 's, die weise mich macht; zu teuer nicht zahl' ich, lass' für die Lehre ich den Tand.

WOTAN

Erlegst du den Hort?

ALBERICH

Löst mir die Hand, so ruf' ich ihn her.

(Loge löst ihm die Schlinge an der rechten Hand. Alberich berührt den Ring mit den Lippen und murmelt heimlich einen Befehl.)

Wohlan, die Nibelungen rief ich mir nah'. Ihrem Herrn gehorchend, hör' ich den Hort aus der Tiefe sie führen zu Tag: nun löst mich vom lästigen Band!

WOTAN

Nicht eh'r, bis alles gezahlt.

(Die Nibelungen steigen aus der Kluft herauf, mit den Geschmeiden des Hortes beladen. Während des Folgenden schichten sie den Hort auf.)

ALBERICH

O schändliche Schmach! Daß die scheuen Knechte geknebelt selbst mich ersch'aun!

(zu den Nibelungen)

Dorthin geführt, wie ich's befehlt'! All zu Hauf schichtet den Hort! Helf' ich euch Lahmen? Hieher nicht gelugt! Rasch da, rasch! Dann rührt euch von hinnen, daß ihr mir schafft! Fort in die Schachten! Weh' euch, find' ich euch faul! Auf den Fersen folg' ich euch nach!

(er küßt seinen Ring und streckt ihn gebieterisch aus. Wie von einem Schlagegetroffen, drängen sich die Nibelungen scheu und ängstlich der Kluft zu, indie sie schnell hinabschlüpfen.)

Gezahlt hab' ich; nun laßt mich zieh'n: und das Helmgeschmeid', das Loge dort hält, das gebt mir nun gütlich zurück!

LOGE

(den Tarnhelm zum Horte werfend)

Zur Buße gehört auch die Beute.

ALBERICH

Verfluchter Dieb!

(leise)

Doch nur Geduld! Der den alten mir schuf, schafft einen andern: noch halt' ich die Macht, der Mime gehorcht. Schlimm zwar ist's, dem schlauen Feind zu lassen die listige Wehr! Nun denn! Alberich ließ euch alles: jetzt löst, ihr Bösen, das Band.

LOGE

(zu Wotan)

Bist du befriedigt? Lass' ich ihn frei?

WOTAN

Ein goldner Ring ragt dir am Finger; hörst du, Alp? Der, acht' ich, gehört mit zum Hort.

ALBERICH

(entsetzt)

Der Ring?

WOTAN

Zu deiner Lösung mußt du ihn lassen.

ALBERICH

(bebend)

Das Leben, doch nicht den Ring!

WOTAN

(heftiger)

Den Reif' verlang' ich, mit dem Leben mach', was du willst!

ALBERICH

Lös' ich mir Leib und Leben, den Ring auch muß ich mir lösen; Hand und Haupt, Aug' und Ohr sind nicht mehr mein Eigen, als hier dieser rote Ring!

WOTAN

Dein Eigen nennst du den Ring? Rasest du, schamloser Albe? Nüchtern sag', wem entnahmst du das Gold, daraus du den schimmernden schufst? War's dein Eigen, was du Arger der Wassertiefe entwandt? Bei des Rheines Töchtern hole dir Rat, ob ihr Gold sie zu eigen dir gaben, das du zum Ring dir geraubt!

ALBERICH

Schmähliche Tücke! Schändlicher Trug! Wirfst du Schächer die Schuld mir vor, die dir so wonnig erwünscht? Wie gern raubtest du selbst dem Rheine das Gold, war nur so leicht die Kunst, es zu schmieden, erlangt? Wie glückt es nun dir Gleißner zum Heil, daß der Niblung, ich, aus schmählicher Not, in des Zornes Zwange, den schrecklichen Zauber gewann, dess' Werk nun lustig dir lacht? Des Unseligen, Angstversehrten fluchfertige, furchtbare Tat, zu fürstlichem Tand soll sie fröhlich dir taugen, zur Freude dir frommen mein Fluch? Hüte dich, herrischer Gott! Frevelte ich, so frevelt' ich frei an mir: doch an allem, was war, ist und wird, frevelst, Ewiger, du, entreißest du frech mir den Ring!

WOTAN

Her der Ring! Kein Recht an ihm schwörst du schwatzend dir zu.

(er ergreift Alberich und entzieht seinem Finger mit heftiger Gewalt den Ring.)

ALBERICH

(gräßlich aufschreiend)

Ha! Zertrümmert! Zerknickt! Der Traurigen traurigster Knecht!

WOTAN

(den Ring betrachtend)

Nun halt' ich, was mich erhebt, der Mächtigen mächtigsten Herrn!

(er steckt den Ring an)

LOGE

Ist er gelöst?

WOTAN

Bind' ihn los!

LOGE

(löst Alberich vollends die Bande)

Schlüpfe denn heim! Keine Schlinge hält dich: frei fahre dahin!

ALBERICH

(sich vom Boden erhebend)

Bin ich nun frei?

(mit wütendem Lachen)

Wirklich frei? So grüß' euch denn meiner Freiheit erster Gruß! -Wie durch Fluch er mir geriet, verflucht sei dieser Ring! Gab sein Gold mir Macht ohne Maß, nun zeug' sein Zauber Tod dem, der ihn trägt! Kein Froher soll seiner sich freun, keinem Glücklichen lache sein lichter Glanz! Wer ihn besitzt, den sehre die Sorge, und wer ihn nicht hat, den nage der Neid! Jeder giere nach seinem Gut, doch keiner genieße mit Nutzen sein! Ohne Wucher hüt' ihn sein Herr; doch den Würger zieh' er ihm zu! Dem Tode verfallen, feßle den Feigen die Furcht: solang er lebt, sterb' er lechzend dahin, des Ringes Herr als des Ringes Knecht: bis in meiner Hand den geraubten wieder ich halte! -So segnet in höchster Not der Nibelung seinen Ring! Behalt' ihn nun,

(lachend)

hüte ihn wohl:

(grimmig)

meinem Fluch fliehest du nicht!

(er verschwindet schnell in der Kluft. Der dichte Nebelduft des Vordergrundes klärt sich allmählich auf)

LOGE

Lauschtest du seinem Liebesgruß?

WOTAN

(in den Anblick des Ringes an seiner Hand versunken)

Gönn' ihm die geifernde Lust!

(Wotan and Loge climb out of the cleft, hauling the bound Alberich with them.)

LOGE

Now, cousin, you just sit tight! Look around you and see the world that you thought you would take for yourself. What little spot did you reserve for my cage?

(He snaps his fingers at him.)

ALBERICH

Scandalous robber! You rogue! You fiend! Untie this rope, let me go free. You soon will repent of this outrage!

WOTAN

You sit there captured, bound tight before me. Just as you though you had the world enclosed in your grasp already, you lie in bonds before me. You coward, do not deny it! To redeem yourself, you'll have to pay ransom.

ALBERICH

I'm a dolt, a self-deceived fool! Why did I trust your devious ruse! Terrible vengeance will pay for this!

LOGE

If you're set on vengeance, you'd better set yourself free: to a bound up wretch no free man crawls for forgiveness. So if you want vengeance, first thing to do is think how to ransom yourself!

(Rubbing his fingers together he indicates the sort of ransom required)

ALBERICH

(curtly)

So state what you desire!

WOTAN

The hoard and your brilliant gold.

ALBERICH

Greedy assortment of thieves!

(aside)


But if I just hold onto the ring, the hoard can be easily spared. It can soon be replaced and increased without bound if I just use the ring to command: It will simply help to make me wise; to give the hoard up for the wisdom and not be too much.

WOTAN

Do you yield the hoard?

ALBERICH

Loosen my hand, I'll summon it here.

(Loge unties his right hand. Alberich touches the ring to his lips and murmurs a secret command.)

All right, the Nibelungs are coming this way. I can hear them now obediently bringing the hoard from the depths to the light: Now kindly untie all these bonds!

WOTAN

Not until everything's paid.

(The Nibelungs climb up out of the cleft, laden with the objects of the hoard. During the following they pile the hoard up.)

ALBERICH

Oh, terrible shame! That my humble servants should see me tied up, myself!

(to the Nibelungs)

Take it all there, as I command! Heap it up in a big pile! Are you all cripples? Don't look over here! Move it! Move! Now back in the caverns! Find me more gold! Back to the mine shafts! Woe to him who slacks off! I am following on your heels!

(He kisses the ring and holds it out. As if struck by a whip, the Nibelungs plunge fearfully back into the cleft and quickly disappear.)

I've paid up now; so let me go: and the helmet piece that Loge has got, you'll kindly return that to me!

LOGE

(Tossing the Tarnhelm onto the hoard)

This booty belongs to the ransom.

ALBERICH

Accursed thief!

(quietly)

But just be brave! He who fashioned the one can make another: I still hold the might that Mime obeys. Still it's sad to lose your clever arms to a devious foe! Well then! Alberich gives it to you: Now fiends, please loosen my bonds.

LOGE

(to Wotan)

So are we finished? May he go free?

WOTAN

A golden ring sits on your finger; hear me, gnome? I feel it belongs to the hoard.

ALBERICH

(shocked)

The ring?

WOTAN

For your salvation you have to leave it.

ALBERICH

(trembling)

Just kill me, don't take the ring!

WOTAN

(vehemently)

I'll have the ring now. With your life go do as you please!

ALBERICH

You might as well just kill me as cruelly take the ring from me. Hand and head, eye and ear are no more part of me as is this golden ring!

WOTAN

You claim the ring is your own? Shameless gnome, why are you raving? Candidly, where did you get the gold, from which you created the thing? Was it part of you, evil villain, that you removed from the flood? With the Rhine's three daughters go have a chat and decide if they gave the gold to you from which you made the ring!

ALBERICH

Shameful deception! Criminal theft! Thief, do you place upon my head the guilt you'd happily bear? How gladly you'd have seized the gold for yourself, if you had not been too weak to pay its high price? How nice for you, you radiant god, that the Nib'lung, I, in wicked distress and the grip of fury, obtained that incomparable power, whose fruits now smile on your head? Was my miserable, fearfully final, disconsolate, terrible deed performed just to fashion your new princely plaything? Was my curse to bring you delight? Watch yourself, arrogant god! If I have sinned, my sin is against myself: but against all that was, is, and will be, immortal, you sin, if you take it from my hand!

WOTAN

Give it here! Your prattling words conjure no right to it.

(He grabs Alberich and forcefully pulls the ring from his finger.)

ALBERICH

(Crying out, strickened)

Ah! Demolished! Destroyed! The saddest of miserable slaves!

WOTAN

(Looking at the ring)

I'm holding what transforms me into the world's almighty lord!

(He puts the ring on)

LOGE

Now is he free?

WOTAN

Cut him loose!

LOGE

(Completely releasing Alberich's bonds)

Slither off home! No restraint confines you: go as a free man!

ALBERICH

(Standing up)

Am I now free?

(With angry laughter)

Really free? Well listen, then, to my freedom's greeting words! -As I won it through a curse, accursed be this ring! If its gold gave limitless power, now may it doom the hand on which it rests! May it delight no joyful heart, may its glimmer lighten no happy face! May he who owns it be dogged by worry and he who doesn't be gnawed at by greed! May all creatures desire its boon, but in possessing it have no joy! My its owner guard it in vain; yet be drawn by it to his doom! Condemned to perish, may terror eat up his soul: yet while he lives may he long for his death. May the ring's lord exist as its slave: until in my hand I again hold that which is stolen! -So out of profound distress the Nib'lung blesses his ring! Retain it now,

(laughing)

hold to it tight:

(grimly)

you can not flee from my curse!

(He quickly disappears into the cleft. The thick mist in the foreground gradually starts to clear.)

LOGE

Did you notice his pledge of love?

WOTAN

(Lost in contemplation of the ring on his hand)

Let him give vent to his rage!

To Non-Academic Interests
Return to top.

An Exerpt from
Die Walküre

by
Richard Wagner

Translation by

John W. Merck, Jr.*

*This English translation may not be reproduced or performed without my written consent.
German text from Dirk Meyer's Der Ring des Nibelungen web site.


ERSTER AUFZUG

DRITTE SZENE

Siegmund, Sieglinde

(Siegmund allein. Es ist vollständig Nacht geworden; der Saal ist nur noch von einem schwachen Feuer im Herde erhellt. Siegmund läßt sich, nah beim Feuer, auf dem Lager nieder und brütet in großer innerer Aufregung eine Zeitlang schweigend vor sich hin).

SIEGMUND


Ein Schwert verhieß mir der Vater, ich fänd' es in höchster Not. Waffenlos fiel ich in Feindes Haus; seiner Rache Pfand, raste ich hier: - ein Weib sah ich, wonnig und hehr: entzückend Bangen zehrt mein Herz. Zu der mich nun Sehnsucht zieht, die mit süßem Zauber mich sehrt, im Zwange hält sie der Mann, der mich Wehrlosen höhnt! Wälse! Wälse! Wo ist dein Schwert? Das starke Schwert, das im Sturm ich schwänge, bricht mir hervor aus der Brust, was wütend das Herz noch hegt?

(Das Feuer bricht zusammen; es fällt aus der aufsprühenden Glut plötzlich ein greller Schein auf die Stelle des Eschenstammes, welche Sieglindes Blick bezeichnet hatte und an der man jetzt deutlich einen Schwertgriff haften sieht)

Was gleißt dort hell im Glimmerschein? Welch ein Strahl bricht aus der Esche Stamm? Des Blinden Auge leuchtet ein Blitz: lustig lacht da der Blick. Wie der Schein so hehr das Herz mir sengt! Ist es der Blick der blühenden Frau, den dort haftend sie hinter sich ließ, als aus dem Saal sie schied?

(Von hier an verglimmt das Herdfeuer allmählich).

Nächtiges Dunkel deckte mein Aug', ihres Blickes Strahl streifte mich da: Wärme gewann ich und Tag. Selig schien mir der Sonne Licht; den Scheitel umgliß mir ihr wonniger Glanz - bis hinter Bergen sie sank.

(Ein neuer schwacher Aufschein des Feuers)

Noch einmal, da sie schied, traf mich abends ihr Schein; selbst der alten Esche Stamm erglänzte in goldner Glut: da bleicht die Blüte, das Licht verlischt; nächtiges Dunkel deckt mir das Auge: tief in des Busens Berge glimmt nur noch lichtlose Glut.

(Das Feuer ist gänzlich verloschen: volle Nacht. Das Seitengemach öffnet sich leise: Sieglinde, in weißem Gewande, tritt heraus und schreitet leise, doch rasch, auf den Herd zu).

SIEGLINDE

Schläfst du, Gast?

SIEGMUND

(freudig überrascht aufspringend)

Wer schleicht daher?

SIEGLINDE

(mit geheimnisvoller Hast)

Ich bin's: höre mich an! In tiefem Schlaf liegt Hunding; ich würzt' ihm betäubenden Trank: nütze die Nacht dir zum Heil!

SIEGMUND

(hitzig unterbrechend)

Heil macht mich dein Nah'n!

SIEGLINDE

Eine Waffe laß mich dir weisen: o wenn du sie gewännst! Den hehrsten Helden dürft' ich dich heißen: dem Stärksten allein ward sie bestimmt. O merke wohl, was ich dir melde! Der Männer Sippe saß hier im Saal, von Hunding zur Hochzeit geladen: er freite ein Weib, das ungefragt Schächer ihm schenkten zur Frau. Traurig saß ich, während sie tranken; ein Fremder trat da herein: ein Greis in blauem Gewand; tief hing ihm der Hut, der deckt' ihm der Augen eines; doch des andren Strahl, Angst schuf es allen, traf die Männer sein mächtiges Dräu'n: mir allein weckte das Auge süß sehnenden Harm, Tränen und Trost zugleich.
Auf mich blickt' er und blitzte auf jene, als ein Schwert in Händen er schwang; das stieß er nun in der Esche Stamm, bis zum Heft haftet' es drin: dem sollte der Stahl geziemen, der aus dem Stamm es zög'. Der Männer alle, so kühn sie sich mühten, die Wehr sich keiner gewann; Gäste kamen und Gäste gingen, die stärksten zogen am Stahl - keinen Zoll entwich er dem Stamm: dort haftet schweigend das Schwert. - Da wußt' ich, wer der war, der mich Gramvolle gegrüßt; ich weiß auch, wem allein im Stamm das Schwert er bestimmt. O fänd' ich ihn hier und heut', den Freund; käm' er aus Fremden zur ärmsten Frau. Was je ich gelitten in grimmigem Leid, was je mich geschmerzt in Schande und Schmach, - süßeste Rache sühnte dann alles! Erjagt hätt' ich, was je ich verlor, was je ich beweint, wär' mir gewonnen, fänd' ich den heiligen Freund, umfing' den Helden mein Arm!

SIEGMUND

(mit Glut Sieglinde umfassend)

Dich selige Frau hält nun der Freund, dem Waffe und Weib bestimmt! Heiß in der Brust brennt mir der Eid, der mich dir Edlen vermählt. Was je ich ersehnt, ersah ich in dir; in dir fand ich, was je mir gefehlt! Littest du Schmach, und schmerzte mich Leid; war ich geächtet, und warst du entehrt: freudige Rache lacht nun den Frohen! Auf lach' ich in heiliger Lust, halt' ich dich Hehre umfangen, fühl' ich dein schlagendes Herz!

(Die große Türe springt auf)

SIEGLINDE

(fährt erschrocken zusammen und reißt sich los.)

Ha, wer ging? Wer kam herein?

(Die Tür bleibt weit geöffnet: außen herrliche Frühlingsnacht; der Vollmond leuchtet herein und wirft sein helles Licht auf das Paar, das so sich plötzlich in voller Deutlichkeit wahrnehmen kann)

SIEGMUND

(in leiser Entzückung)

Keiner ging - doch einer kam: siehe, der Lenz lacht in den Saal!

(Siegmund zieht Sieglinde mit sanfter Gewalt zu sich auf das Lager, so daß sie neben ihm zu sitzen kommt. Wachsende Helligkeit des Mondscheines)

Winterstürme wichen dem Wonnemond, in mildem Lichte leuchtet der Lenz; auf linden Lüften leicht und lieblich, Wunder webend er sich wiegt; durch Wald und Auen weht sein Atem, weit geöffnet lacht sein Aug': - aus sel'ger Vöglein Sange süß er tönt, holde Düfte haucht er aus; seinem warmen Blut entblühen wonnige Blumen, Keim und Sproß entspringt seiner Kraft. Mit zarter Waffen Zier bezwingt er die Welt; Winter und Sturm wichen der starken Wehr: wohl mußte den tapfern Streichen die strenge Türe auch weichen, die trotzig und starr uns trennte von ihm. - Zu seiner Schwester schwang er sich her; die Liebe lockte den Lenz: in unsrem Busen barg sie sich tief; nun lacht sie selig dem Licht. Die bräutliche Schwester befreite der Bruder; zertrümmert liegt, was je sie getrennt: jauchzend grüßt sich das junge Paar: vereint sind Liebe und Lenz!

SIEGLINDE

Du bist der Lenz, nach dem ich verlangte in frostigen Winters Frist. Dich grüßte mein Herz mit heiligem Grau'n, als dein Blick zuerst mir erblühte. Fremdes nur sah ich von je, freudlos war mir das Nahe. Als hätt' ich nie es gekannt, war, was immer mir kam.
Doch dich kannt' ich deutlich und klar: als mein Auge dich sah, warst du mein Eigen; was im Busen ich barg, was ich bin, hell wie der Tag taucht' es mir auf, o wie tönender Schall schlug's an mein Ohr, als in frostig öder Fremde zuerst ich den Freund ersah.

(Sie hängt sich entzückt an seinen Hals und blickt ihm nahe ins Gesicht)

SIEGMUND

(mit Hingerissenheit)

O süßeste Wonne! O seligstes Weib!

SIEGLINDE

(dicht an seinen Augen)

O laß in Nähe zu dir mich neigen, daß hell ich schaue den hehren Schein, der dir aus Aug' und Antlitz bricht und so süß die Sinne mir zwingt.

SIEGMUND

Im Lenzesmond leuchtest du hell; hehr umwebt dich das Wellenhaar: was mich berückt, errat' ich nun leicht, denn wonnig weidet mein Blick.

SIEGLINDE

(schlägt ihm die Locken von der Stirn zurück und betrachtet ihn staunend)

Wie dir die Stirn so offen steht, der Adern Geäst in den Schläfen sich schlingt! Mir zagt es vor der Wonne, die mich entzückt! Ein Wunder will mich gemahnen: den heut' zuerst ich erschaut, mein Auge sah dich schon!

SIEGMUND

Ein Minnetraum gemahnt auch mich: in heißem Sehnen sah ich dich schon!

SIEGLINDE

Im Bach erblickt' ich mein eigen Bild - und jetzt gewahr' ich es wieder: wie einst dem Teich es enttaucht, bietest mein Bild mir nun du!

SIEGMUND

Du bist das Bild, das ich in mir barg.

SIEGLINDE

(den Blick schnell abwendend)

O still! Laß mich der Stimme lauschen:

mich dünkt, ihren Klang hört' ich als Kind.

(aufgeregt)

Doch nein! Ich hörte sie neulich, als meiner Stimme Schall mir widerhallte der Wald.

SIEGMUND

O lieblichste Laute, denen ich lausche!

SIEGLINDE

(ihm wieder in die Augen spähend)

Deines Auges Glut erglänzte mir schon: so blickte der Greis grüßend auf mich, als der Traurigen Trost er gab. An dem Blick erkannt' ihn sein Kind - schon wollt' ich beim Namen ihn nennen!

(Sie hält inne und fährt dann leise fort)

Wehwalt heißt du fürwahr?

SIEGMUND

Nicht heiß' ich so, seit du mich liebst: nun walt' ich der hehrsten Wonnen!

SIEGLINDE

Und Friedmund darfst du froh dich nicht nennen?

SIEGMUND

Nenne mich du, wie du liebst, daß ich heiße: den Namen nehm' ich von dir!

SIEGLINDE

Doch nanntest du Wolfe den Vater?

SIEGMUND

Ein Wolf war er feigen Füchsen! Doch dem so stolz strahlte das Auge, wie, Herrliche, hehr dir es strahlt, der war: - Wälse genannt.
SIEGLINDE

(außer sich)

War Wälse dein Vater, und bist du ein Wälsung, stieß er für dich sein Schwert in den Stamm, so laß mich dich heißen, wie ich dich liebe: Siegmund - so nenn' ich dich!

SIEGMUND

(springt auf den Stamm zu und faßt den Schwertgriff)

Siegmund heiß' ich und Siegmund bin ich! Bezeug' es dies Schwert, das zaglos ich halte! Wälse verhieß mir, in höchster Not fänd' ich es einst: ich faß' es nun! Heiligster Minne höchste Not, sehnender Liebe sehrende Not brennt mir hell in der Brust, drängt zu Tat und Tod: Notung! Notung! So nenn' ich dich, Schwert - Notung! Notung! Neidlicher Stahl! Zeig' deiner Schärfe schneidenden Zahn: heraus aus der Scheide zu mir!

(Er zieht mit einem gewaltigen Zuck das Schwert aus dem Stamme und zeigt es der von Staunen und Entzücken erfaßten Sieglinde)

Siegmund, den Wälsung, siehst du, Weib! Als Brautgabe bringt er dies Schwert: so freit er sich die seligste Frau; dem Feindeshaus entführt er dich so. Fern von hier folge mir nun, fort in des Lenzes lachendes Haus: dort schützt dich Notung, das Schwert, wenn Siegmund dir liebend erlag!

(Er hat sie umfaßt, um sie mit sich fortzuziehen).

SIEGLINDE

(reißt sich in höchster Trunkenheit von ihm los und stellt sich ihm gegenüber)

Bist du Siegmund, den ich hier sehe, Sieglinde bin ich, die dich ersehnt: die eigne Schwester gewannst du zu eins mit dem Schwert!

SIEGMUND

Braut und Schwester bist du dem Bruder - so blühe denn, Wälsungen-Blut!

(Er zieht sie mit wütender Glut an sich; sie sinkt mit einem Schrei an seine Brust. Der Vorhang fällt schnell)

ACT I

SCENE THREE

Siegmund, Sieglinde

(Siegmund alone. Night has fallen; The room is illuminated only by a weak fire in the hearth. Siegmund lowers himself onto the bench next to the fire and broods silently for a while in great inner turmoil).

SIEGMUND

My father promised a weapon. I'd find it in greatest need. Unarmed I fall in my enemy's house. Now I stay here to seal his revenge. A woman's here, lovely and fine. Bewitching fears consume my heart. She to whom I'm drawn by desire, she who's magic pierces my soul, is chattel here to the man who mocks my helplessness! Wälse! Wälse! Where is your sword, the mighty sword I would wield in battle? Is it supposed to take shape and burst from my trembling heart?

(The fire collapses, causing a harsh light to fall on the spot on the ash trunk to which Sieglinde's had glanced, and where a sword hilt is now plainly visible.)

What glitters in the shadows there? What's that radiance in the ash tree's boughs? I'm blinded by the shimmering flash laughing there in the dark. How the lovely sight affects my heart! Or did the radiant woman's two eyes leave their gleam hanging there on the branch as she walked out of the room?

(From here on, the fire in the hearth gradually goes out).

Nocturnal darkness covered my eyes, but her shimmering gaze shone down on me; then I had daylight and warmth. Blessed sunlight lit up my eyes. Its joyous radiance shone all around, until it sank out of sight.

(A new weak glow from the fire)

Now once again I see, this diminishing light; and the ancient ash tree's trunk reflects its golden rays. The light's extinguished, the color's gone. Nocturnal darkness covers my eyelids; yet in my bosom's depth there still burns a hot lightless fire.

(The fire has gone out completely: full night. The side room door opens quietly: Sieglinde, in white garments, emerges and steps quietly, but quickly tot he hearth).

SIEGLINDE

Are you up?

SIEGMUND

(jumping up, happily surprised)

Who's over there?

SIEGLINDE

It's me: listen and learn! I've taken care of Hunding: I mixed him a narcotic drink: Make yourself safe in the night!

SIEGMUND

(interrupting passionately)

You presence saves me!

SIEGLINDE

Let me show you where there is a weapon: If you could claim it now! I would welcome you as the greatest of heroes: the strongest alone may make it his. Now listen well to what I tell you! The men-folks' kinsmen sat in this hall, invited to view Hunding's wedding. He married a maid whom, with no choice, robbers had given as wife. I sat sadly while they were drinking; A stranger came through the door: an old man in a gray cloak; his hat hung down low, so one of his eyes was covered; but the other's gaze made them all fearful, when the men saw its grave stern resolve. Just to me his gaze confided sweet longing remorse, sad and consoling at once. He looked at me and glared at the others, as we swung a sword in his hands. He plunged it into the ash trees' trunk. To the hilt he thrust it in. The blade would belong to him who could pull it from the tree. No matter how great the men-folk's exertions, they couldn't pull out the sword. Guests arrived and guests departed. The strongest tugged at the steel - but it would not budge from the tree. The sword still sits there today. I knew then who it was who had sought me in my grief; I knew for whom alone the mighty sword had been made. If I can find him here and now, that friend; if he's come out of the distance to me: whatever I've suffered in miserable grief, whatever has cut me with scandal and shame, Sweet blessed vengeance would make it all well! I'd take back everything I have lost, Whatever I've mourned would be recovered, if I could find this blessed friend, embrace him tight in my arms!

SIEGMUND

(embracing Sieglinde passionately)

Your friend holds you now, blessed love, whose destined for wife and blade. Inside my breast, hot burns the oath that pledges fealty to you. Whatever I've craved, I saw it in you. In you I found whatever I've lacked! If you were shamed and I cut by grief; if I was hated and you were debased: sweet certain vengeance now smiles upon us! I cry out in blessed delight, holding your body against me, feeling your wild beating heart!

(The entrance door springs open)

SIEGLINDE

(startles and pulls herself away)

Who went out? Who came inside?

(The door stands wide open: Outside is a splendid spring night; the full moon shines in, throwing bright light on the couple, who have suddenly become fully visible.)

SIEGMUND

(with quiet enchantment)

No one went, but someone's come. See how the Spring smiles in the hall!

(Siegmund pulls Sieglinde softly to him on the bench, so that she comes to sit beside him. Brightening moonlight.)

Winter storms give way to the joyful moon. In gentle moonlight Springtime appears. On fragrant breezes, light and lovely, weaving wonders as he goes; through wood and meadow wafts his spirit, open wide his eyes rejoice. He sings his message out of the songbirds throats. Soothing vapors leave his lips. Out of his warm blood the flowers take their refreshment. Seed and shoot rise up through his power. With tender weapons springtime conquers the world. Winter and storm yield to his mighty arms. And to his invincible blows the rigid walls also crumble that stubborn and strong barred our way to him. To his own sister he makes his way, for Love entices the Spring. Inside our bosoms they were concealed; But now they are smiling in the light. Enamored the brother courts his own sister. What held them separate now lies in ruins. Crying out the young pair is joined. United are Love and the Spring!

SIEGLINDE

You are the Spring for which I've been longing throughout this cold wintertime. My heart called to you with reverent awe, the first time I set my eyes on you. Everything's alien here. No friend to give me comfort, where everything is unknown, unfamiliar, and strange. But I knew you clearly and plain. As I looked on your face my spirit owned you. What I've kept in my heart, what I am, bright as the day rose to the light. A thundering rush cried out my name, in this cold deserted wasteland the first time I saw my friend.

(Enchanted, she puts her arms around his neck and gazes closely into his face.)

SIEGMUND

(transported)

Oh sweetest enchantment! Most blessed love!

SIEGLINDE

(looking into his eyes)

Oh, let me draw myself closer to you, so I can take in the radiant light, that streams from your eyes, that lights your face, and so sweetly transfixes my gaze.

SIEGMUND

In Spring moonlight you look so fine; gloriously wreathed in your flowing hair. All I've desired appears before me, as joyously I feast my eyes.

SIEGLINDE

(she brushes the locks from his forehead and observes him in wonder)

Your forehead is so broad and proud, its network of veins like a laurel wreath crown! I'm breathless with the longing that flows through me! It makes me think of a wonder: Though I first saw you today, I've seen you in the past!

SIEGMUND

A dream of love haunts me as well: In wild desire I've seen you before!

SIEGLINDE

I saw my face mirrored in the stream and now I see it reflected, as it appeared in the brook. I see myself in you!

SIEGMUND

You are the image I've kept in my heart.

SIEGLINDE

(Averting her gaze quickly)

Oh hush! I want to take your voice in. I'm sure that I heard it as a child. (excited)

But no! I've recently heard it, as my own voice's sound would echo out of the wood.

SIEGMUND

Oh loveliest sounds that flow through my senses!

SIEGLINDE

(Looking into his eyes again)

And your two eyes' fire has warmed me before: That's how the old man looked upon me when he reached out to me in my pain. His own child could tell him at once. I almost called out his name to him!

(She stops, then slowly continues)

Woeful's really your name?

SIEGMUND

Not anymore since I found you. Now I have the greatest of pleasures!

SIEGLINDE

And Peaceful isn't really appropriate?

SIEGMUND

Name me yourself, in whatever way suits you. I'll take my name from you!

SIEGLINDE

But you said that Wolf was your father?

SIEGMUND

A wolf amidst craven foxes! But he whose eyes shone with such ardor, like your eyes shine on me now, was called Wälse in truth.

SIEGLINDE

(beside herself)

If Wälse's your father, then you are a Wälsung. He left this sword waiting for you. So let me now name you, as I would love you. Siegmund: this is your name!

SIEGMUND

(jumps to the tree trunk and grasps the sword's hilt)

Call me Siegmund, for I am Siegmund! Bear witness, O sword, as I bravely hold you! Wälse once promised I'd find you some day, in deep distress. I grasp you now! Holy affection - greatest distress, love's sacred longing - searing distress, blaze up bright in my heart, call to deeds and death: Needful! Needful! I name you o sword. Needful! Needful! fabulous blade! Show me your sharp invincible edge. Come out of your scabbard to me!

(With a powerful tug, he pulls the sword from the trunk and show it to the amazed and delighted Sieglinde)

Siegmund, the Wälsung greets you, wife! As wedding gift he brings this sword. And thus he weds his most precious friend; and leads her from his enemy's house. Far away come with me now, out in the springtime's laughing abode; where Needful will keep you safe, though Siegmund should drop dead of love!

(He embraces her in order to take her out with him).

SIEGLINDE

Are you Siegmund standing before me? I am Sieglinde who's longed for you. You've won your own sister together with your promised sword!

SIEGMUND

Bride and sister you shall be to me. So let Wälse's bloodline increase!

(He pulls her to him with burning passion. She sinks onto his chest with a cry. The curtain quickly falls)

To beginning of Die Walküre.
To Non-Academic Interests
Return to top.

An Exerpt from
Act I Scene 3 of
Die Götterdämmerung

by
Richard Wagner

Translation by

John W. Merck, Jr.*

*This English translation may not be reproduced or performed without my written consent.
German text from Dirk Meyer's Der Ring des Nibelungen web site.


(Es ist Abend geworden. Aus der Tiefe leuchtet der Feuerschein allmählich
heller auf. Brünnhilde blickt ruhig in die Landschaft hinaus)

Abendlich Dämmern deckt den Himmel;
heller leuchtet die hütende Lohe herauf.

(Der Feuerschein nähert sich aus der Tiefe. Immer glühendere Flammenzungen
lecken über den Felsensaum auf)

Was leckt so wütend
die lodernde Welle zum Wall?
Zur Felsenspitze wälzt sich der feurige Schwall.

(Man hört aus der Tiefe Siegfrieds Hornruf nahen. Brünnhilde lauscht und fährt entzückt auf)

Siegfried! Siegfried zurück?
Seinen Ruf sendet er her!
Auf! - Auf! Ihm entgegen!
In meines Gottes Arm!

(Sie eilt in höchstem Entzücken dem Felsrande zu. Feuerflammen schlagen
herauf: aus ihnen springt Siegfried auf einen hochragenden Felsstein empor,
worauf die Flammen sogleich wieder zurückweichen und abermals nur aus der Tiefe heraufleuchten. Siegfried, auf dem Haupte den Tarnhelm, der ihm bis zur Hälfte das Gesicht verdeckt und nur die Augen freiläßt, erscheint inGunthers Gestalt)

BRÜNNHILDE

(voll Entsetzen zurückweichend)

Verrat! Wer drang zu mir?

(Sie flieht bis in den Vordergrund und heftet von da aus in sprachlosem
Erstaunen ihren Blick auf Siegfried)

SIEGFRIED

(im Hintergrunde auf dem Steine verweilend, betrachtet sie lange, regungslos auf seinen Schild gelehnt; dann redet er sie mit verstellter - tieferer - Stimme an)

Brünnhild'! Ein Freier kam,
den dein Feuer nicht geschreckt.
Dich werb' ich nun zum Weib:
du folge willig mir!

BRÜNNHILDE

(heftig zitternd)

Wer ist der Mann,
der das vermochte,
was dem Stärksten nur bestimmt?

SIEGFRIED

(unverändert wie zuvor)

Ein Helde, der dich zähmt,
bezwingt Gewalt dich nur.

BRÜNNHILDE

(von Grausen erfaßt)

Ein Unhold schwang sich auf jenen Stein!
Ein Aar kam geflogen,
mich zu zerfleischen!
Wer bist du, Schrecklicher?

(Langes Schweigen)

Stammst du von Menschen?
Kommst du von Hellas nächtlichem Heer?

SIEGFRIED

(wie zuvor, mit etwas bebender Stimme beginnend, alsbald aber wieder
sicherer fortfahrend)

Ein Gibichung bin ich,
und Gunther heißt der Held,
dem, Frau, du folgen sollst.

BRÜNNHILDE

(in Verzweiflung ausbrechend)

Wotan! Ergrimmter, grausamer Gott!
Weh'! Nun erseh' ich der Strafe Sinn:
zu Hohn und Jammer jagst du mich hin!

SIEGFRIED

(springt vom Stein herab und tritt näher heran)

Die Nacht bricht an:
in diesem Gemach
mußt du dich mir vermählen!

BRÜNNHILDE

(indem sie den Finger, an dem sie Siegfrieds Ring trägt, drohend ausstreckt)

Bleib' fern! Fürchte dies Zeichen!
Zur Schande zwingst du mich nicht,
solang' der Ring mich beschützt.

SIEGFRIED

Mannesrecht gebe er Gunther,
durch den Ring sei ihm vermählt!

BRÜNNHILDE

Zurück, du Räuber!
Frevelnder Dieb!
Erfreche dich nicht, mir zu nahn!
Stärker als Stahl macht mich der Ring:
nie - raubst du ihn mir!

SIEGFRIED

Von dir ihn zu lösen,
lehrst du mich nun!

(Er dringt auf sie ein; sie ringen miteinander. Brünnhilde windet sich los, flieht und wendet sich um, wie zur Wehr. Siegfried greift sie von neuem an. Sie flieht, er erreicht sie. Beide ringen heftig miteinander. Er faßt sie
bei der Hand und entzieht ihrem Finger den Ring. Sie schreit heftig auf. Als sie wie zerbrochen in seinen Armen niedersinkt, streift ihr Blick bewußtlos die Augen Siegfrieds)

SIEGFRIED

(läßt die Machtlose auf die Steinbank vor dem Felsengemach niedergleiten)

Jetzt bist du mein,
Brünnhilde, Gunthers Braut. -
Gönne mir nun dein Gemach!

BRÜNNHILDE

(starrt ohnmächtig vor sich hin, matt)

Was könntest du wehren, elendes Weib!

(Siegfried treibt sie mit einer gebietenden Bewegung an. Zitternd und wankenden Schrittes geht sie in das Gemach)

SIEGFRIED

(das Schwert ziehend, mit seiner natürlichen Stimme)

Nun, Notung, zeuge du,
daß ich in Züchten warb.
Die Treue wahrend dem Bruder,
trenne mich von seiner Braut!
(Er folgt Brünnhilde. Die Vorhang fällt)

(Evening has arrived. From the depths the firelight gradually becomes brighter. Brünnhilde gazes quietly across the landscape.)

Evening twilight covers the heavens;
Brighter now is the light of the sheltering fire.

(The firelight increases in the depths. Even brighter tongues of flame lick over the edge of the rock.)

Why are the flames licking
up to the edge of the rock?
The withering swell climbs up to the peak of the scarp.

(Siegfried's horn call is heard approaching in the depths. Brünnhilde listens and starts up, enraptured.)

Siegfried! Siegfried is back?
With his call he reaches to me!
Up! - Up! Go to meet him!
Held in my idol's arms!

(She hurries in absolute rapture to the edge of the rock. Flames rise up: Siegfried leaps from them onto a high rock, whereupon the flames immediately recede and once again are seen only glowing in the depths. Siegfried, with the tarnhelm on his head, covering up to half of his face so only his eyes are visible, appears in Gunther's form.)

BRÜNNHILDE

(Recoiling in horror.)

Betrayed! Who's come to me?

(She flees to the foreground and from there raises her astounded gaze to Siegfried.)

SIEGFRIED

(Remaining on the rock in the background, watches her for a while, leaning quietly on his shield. He then addresses her in a disguised, deeper voice.)

Brünnhild'! A suitor's come,
who's not frightened of your fire.
I claim you as my wife.
You'll come now willingly!

BRÜNNHILDE

(Trembling strongly)

Who is the man
who could accomplish
what was meant for someone else?

SIEGFRIED

(Unchanged)

A warrior, who'll use force,
if that is what it takes.

BRÜNNHILDE

(Gripped by horror)

A demon's landed upon this rock!
A harpy has flown here,
set to devour me!
Who are you, fearful one?

(Long silence)

Could you be human?
Are you from Hella's infernal host?

SIEGFRIED

(as previously, starting with a somewhat tremulous voice, but immediately becoming more certain.)

My father was Gibich,
and Gunther is the man,
whom you must follow now.

BRÜNNHILDE

(Bursting out in despair.)

Wotan! Enraged and terrible god!
Woe! Now I see your true punishment:
debased you drive me to misery!

SIEGFRIED

(Jumps down from the rock and steps nearer.)

It's getting dark:
inside of this cave
you and I must be wedded!

BRÜNNHILDE

(during which she threateningly raises the finger on which she wears Siegfried's ring.)

Stay back! Shrink from this token!
You won't compel me to shame,
because the ring keeps me safe!

SIEGFRIED

Husband's right gives it to Gunther,
with this ring we shall be wed!

BRÜNNHILDE

Get back, you robber!
Impious thief!
Don't presume to come near me!
Thanks to the ring, I'm strong as steel:
You'll never steal it!

SIEGFRIED

It seems that I'll have to,
since you won't yield!

(He bear upon her; they fight. Brünnhilde breaks away, flees, and turns around, as if to fight. Siegfried attacks her again. She flees, he catches up with her. They wrestle strenuously. He grasps her by the hand and removes the ring from her finger. She screams loudly and sinks, broken, into his arms, at which point her gaze unconsciously meets his.)

SIEGFRIED

(lowers her onto the stone bench in front of the cave.)

Now you are mine,
Brünnhilde, Gunther's bride. -
Let me come into your cave!

BRÜNNHILDE

(stares impotently in front of herself, dully)

Just what did you hope for, miserable girl!

(Siegfried beckons her with an inviting gesture. Trembling and with faltering steps, she goes into the cave.)

SIEGFRIED

(Drawing his sword, and with his natural voice.)

Now, Needful, show the world
I courted in good faith.
Protect the trust of my brother,
separate me from his bride!

(He follows Brünnhilde. Curtain)

To beginning of Die Götterdämmerung.
To Non-Academic Interests
Return to top.