Family History - Xinjiang

Xinjiang, the wild west of the People's Republic of China, occupies the Tarim Basin northwest of Tibet and East of the Turkic nations of Central Asia. It is isolated by deserts and high mountains and sparsely populated, but was crossed by the main arteries of the Silk Road. Thus, Xinjiang forms a nexus between Central Asia, Tibet, and China .

Major migrations into Xinjiang include:

Second Century: The Central Asian Uzbeks conquered and held Xinjiang. If your ancestors lived here in CE 500, their ancestors might have lived both there and in Central Asia in 1 CE.

Seventh Century: As part of their general expansion, Turkic nations settled in China in large numbers. At the beginning of the Tang dynasty (7th century), the Chinese dealt with what they viewed as the Turkic threat by conquering Xinjiang and Central Asia. If your ancestors lived here in CE 1000, their ancestors might have lived both there and in Central China in 500 CE.

Eighth Century: The Uighurs emerged from what is now Mongolia and conquered and held Xinjiang. If your ancestors lived here in CE 1000, their ancestors might have lived both there and in Mongolia in 500 CE., Note: The Uighurs have remained the majority nationality in Xinjiang ever since.

The thirteenth century: Xinjiang became part of the Mongol Empire. The Uighurs were allies of the Mongols from early and enjoyed high status their empire. The Mongol rulers developed an excellent communication system and employed talented people from all over their domains, so If your ancestors were in Xinjiang in 1490, they could easily have had ancestors in any of the Mongol Empire in CE 1000.

Eighteenth Century: The Manchus took over China. In 1756 they added Xinjiang to their empire, the Qing Dynasty. Since then, Xinjiang has been part of China, with ethnic Chinese settlements making gradual inroads. If your ancestors were in Xinjiang in 1800, then their ancestors could also have been from central and eastern China in 1490.