Name of Your Field Trip Site

Date of Field Trip

Since you may be doing multiple reaction papers by the end of your time in ELT, you'll want to rename this file. You might name it after the site location, or the semester, or just "fieldtrip1.html", "fieldtrip2.html", etc.

In any case, your report has certain required pieces of information for full credit. You need to mention where we went, what we did, and what you saw. Most importantly, you need to demonstrate what you learned about the natural historical sciences, or the presentation of the natural sciences, by going to that particular field trip site. We want to keep on doing field trips, and this information will help in demonstrating the utility of these trips as an educational exercise, and not merely a chance to get you guys off campus once a semester!


Caption for a picture from the site. Not needed, but could be good.

Your reports have to be factually correct, and free from spelling and grammatical errors (After all, your are in the University now, and are getting credit for this.) Keep in mind the ELT Grading Rubric, which will be used in assessing this report. Also, by being up on the web, people from all over the planet (including your family!!) can see this; you'll want to make certain that you are presenting yourself as an educated individual.

We would really like to see some original synthesis on your part. We're not talking about some deep philosophical tracts or profound poetry or the like (although if you are so inspired, we're not going to stop you!) What we want to see is that you are able to make connections between the experiences on the trip and your classwork and readings (with ELT colloquia and other classes, too.) Also, you can use this opportunity to show that you are a critical observer: if there are aspects about the field trip site which you felt were particularly effective (or, alternatively, which you think might be better presented in some other way), please feel free to write about that.

Please note that we will require you to answer certain questions for each particular field trips. As this is a generic template, we don't list them here. They will be on the handouts given for each individual trip.

So, to review, here are the requirements:

P.S. A link to the official website of the location, if any, might be a good idea. It isn't required, but it might be nice.


Here's a caption spot for another picture. We like pictures!


Annotated Bibliography

This section should include the annotated bibliography for your field trip report. This normally consists of:

For each article, create a link to the article on your website and give a proper citation for each (see below for more details), and give an annotation for each. This annotation should be a short (2-4 sentence on average) summary of the observations and conclusions of the article in question. You should clearly establish the link between the article in question and some aspect of the material you observed.


CITING ARTICLES FOR FIELD TRIP REPORT

An important part of citing material online is to give as direct a link as possible. That is, the URL you link to should be to the main server of the institution in question (e.g., washingtonpost.com, sciencedirect.com, etc.) It should NOT have google.com or yahoo.com or similar search engine addresses as part of the URL. You will certainly need these search engines to find the sites, but when you find them link directly to the original version, not to the search result. Additionally, we highly recommend that once you have your links up that you check them from someone else's computer to make sure that you have them properly formatted.

Below is a description of the bibliographic format we ask you to follow.

Citation Rules for News Media Report

When linking to the online version of a newspaper article, use the following style:

Author's last name, Initial of first name. [If no name listed, use "Anonymous"]. day month year. "Title of article [with a direct hotlink to the online version]". Name of Newspaper, Page number (if available). Accessed day month year.

Here is an example:

Achenbach, Joel. 1 October 2009. "Scientists: 'Ardi' Fossil Sheds Light on Origin of Human Species." Washington Post. Accessed 1 October 2009.

When linking to the online version of a magazine article, use the following style:

Author's last name, Initial of first name. [If no name listed, use "Anonymous"]. day month year [or just month and year if it is a monthly magazine]. "Title of article [with a direct hotlink to the online version]". Name of Magazine, Page number (if available). Accessed day month year.

Here is an example:

Zimmer, C. 12 February 2009. "The ever-evolving theories of Darwin." Time. Accessed 26 February 2009.

When linking to an online news organization, use the following style:

Author's last name, Initial of first name. [If no name listed, use "Anonymous"]. day month, year. "Title of article [with a direct hotlink to the online version]". Name of Newssite. Accessed day month year.

Here is an example:

Rincon, P. 26 February, 2009. "Fish fossil clue to origin of sex." BBC News. Accessed 26 February 2009.

Citation Rules for Technical Articles

When linking to the online version of an article in a technical journal, please use the following style:

First author's last name, Initial of first (and additional) name., Initial of second author's first (and additional) name, second author's last name, and initial of final author's first (and additional) name, final author's last name. Year. Title of article [with a direct hotlink to the online version; note that there are no quotes around the technical article name!]. Journal name Volume number: first page-last page. DOI number (if one is provided).

Here is an example:

Long, J.A., K. Trinajstic, and Z. Johanson. 2009. Devonian arthrodire embryos and the origin of internal fertilization in vertebrates. Nature 457: 1124-1127. doi:10.1038/nature07732


Last modified: XX Sometember 200Y